(image)
When I was in middle school, I decided to start recording my days in a journal. I had a simple notebook in which I recorded my thoughts, but with two brothers, it was difficult to keep my journal private. I wrote vaguely, trying not to reveal too much in case someone stumbled upon my journal. My parents of course knew I wrote, an activity they both encouraged, but I got teased a lot by my brothers. Eventually I came up with a coded alphabet for my journal, and soon thought the code to my two childhood best friends. Together we all had a journal, in which we wrote our deepest secrets, knowing that only the three of us could decode its meaning.

Writing in a journal gave me confidence to dive into fiction writing. In middle school I wrote a play, mostly to entertain one of my best friends. She would usher me to write the next chapter, fantasizing over one of the boys in the scene. Later on, in High School I completed my very first novel. It was well received among my friends, and I felt confident enough to try to publish it. This was when floppy disks were à la mode. At the time, I didn't know about the importance of backing up, but I learned it quickly thereafter. My younger brother one day decided to format the family computer, and not knowing that I had my work on it, he proceeded. I remember I was so shocked that the tears wouldn't come. I'm not sure if the story was as good as I believed it to be, but I would have loved to still have this very first manuscript saved for posterity.
(image)
Journaling, as well as fiction writing, have been part of my identity over the past years. Despite my inconsistencies to keep up with them over the years, I find it nice to know that they are always there waiting for me to pick up right where I left them. Recently, I have been seeing a trend take over the internet. Everyone is sharing pictures of their journals; everyone is trying themselves at writing. I wonder if it is because of all the successful people, backed up by scientific data, who swear that journaling everyday can change your life? Or is it all the benefits that lure people in? Or perhaps, is it that people have been doing it shyly (just as I did in middle school), and finally are ready to share pages and pages of memories with the world? Of course, it could be a mixture of all of the above. Personally, this makes me happy. To see so many beautifully filled pages spread all over the internet. 

Browsing through the web, I came across wonderful blogs who share all the beautiful journals people keep around the world. So far my favorites are Hypergraphia , Journaling Junkie, and Astral & Star Stitched. I could just scroll endlessly if given the time. Looking through all the shared imagery, I have started thinking more seriously about getting back to writing. Recording for posterity my thoughts, and random moments of my daily life, while practicing on a more constant schedule my creative writing. Maybe doing so will spark more topics for this blog? I have already acquired a new blank journal, and cannot wait to start writing in it over the weekend. We always think of our memory as being infallible, but who knows when a memory we once held dear begins to fade only to become a distant blur? I'd like to immortalize such moments forever. And who knows what else could come my way?

So this is me, going back to the basics of keeping a daily journal, and writing more often. 

Do you keep a diary of sorts? 

If not, how do you ensure your memories are kept for posterity?

(image)
When I was in middle school, I decided to start recording my days in a journal. I had a simple notebook in which I recorded my thoughts, but with two brothers, it was difficult to keep my journal private. I wrote vaguely, trying not to reveal too much in case someone stumbled upon my journal. My parents of course knew I wrote, an activity they both encouraged, but I got teased a lot by my brothers. Eventually I came up with a coded alphabet for my journal, and soon thought the code to my two childhood best friends. Together we all had a journal, in which we wrote our deepest secrets, knowing that only the three of us could decode its meaning.

Writing in a journal gave me confidence to dive into fiction writing. In middle school I wrote a play, mostly to entertain one of my best friends. She would usher me to write the next chapter, fantasizing over one of the boys in the scene. Later on, in High School I completed my very first novel. It was well received among my friends, and I felt confident enough to try to publish it. This was when floppy disks were à la mode. At the time, I didn't know about the importance of backing up, but I learned it quickly thereafter. My younger brother one day decided to format the family computer, and not knowing that I had my work on it, he proceeded. I remember I was so shocked that the tears wouldn't come. I'm not sure if the story was as good as I believed it to be, but I would have loved to still have this very first manuscript saved for posterity.
(image)
Journaling, as well as fiction writing, have been part of my identity over the past years. Despite my inconsistencies to keep up with them over the years, I find it nice to know that they are always there waiting for me to pick up right where I left them. Recently, I have been seeing a trend take over the internet. Everyone is sharing pictures of their journals; everyone is trying themselves at writing. I wonder if it is because of all the successful people, backed up by scientific data, who swear that journaling everyday can change your life? Or is it all the benefits that lure people in? Or perhaps, is it that people have been doing it shyly (just as I did in middle school), and finally are ready to share pages and pages of memories with the world? Of course, it could be a mixture of all of the above. Personally, this makes me happy. To see so many beautifully filled pages spread all over the internet. 

Browsing through the web, I came across wonderful blogs who share all the beautiful journals people keep around the world. So far my favorites are Hypergraphia , Journaling Junkie, and Astral & Star Stitched. I could just scroll endlessly if given the time. Looking through all the shared imagery, I have started thinking more seriously about getting back to writing. Recording for posterity my thoughts, and random moments of my daily life, while practicing on a more constant schedule my creative writing. Maybe doing so will spark more topics for this blog? I have already acquired a new blank journal, and cannot wait to start writing in it over the weekend. We always think of our memory as being infallible, but who knows when a memory we once held dear begins to fade only to become a distant blur? I'd like to immortalize such moments forever. And who knows what else could come my way?

So this is me, going back to the basics of keeping a daily journal, and writing more often. 

Do you keep a diary of sorts? 

If not, how do you ensure your memories are kept for posterity?

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