Designer collaborations... you either love them or hate them. I remember the time when H&M introduced us to designer collaborations in 2004, trend later picked  up by brands such as Target and Macy's. Today, designer collaborations have sort of become a norm, everyone does them, and everyone wants them. I am usually not swayed by this trend. I might admire some pieces here and there, but to me, they never make past a season. They are not atemporal like the originals would be, and once one invests in a designer top contracted by Target, it's not long before they are out of fashion.

That said, not all collaborations are just a waste of your money. I think the best collaborations are made between brands that truly curate according to their brand image and philosophy. It is not always about signing up a big shot name, but it is more about promoting designers who fit into the house's idea, and who sometimes might not be well known by the general public. One of the few brands that I think has understood the essence of a successful designer collaboration is the Japanese clothing brand UNIQLO. Not only do they not run out of these designer made collections (so everyone has a chance to acquire a desired piece), but they carefully introduce designers who add a nice touch to the whole minimal/effortless aspect of the Japanese fashion industry.

Right now UNIQLO has two permanent designer collaborations for the men's line (Lemaire and Djokovic & Nishikori performance wear), whereas the women's collection has three permanent designer collections (Carine Roitfeld, Ines de la Fressange, and Lemaire). However, this last number is about to be bumped to four, as the Japanese brand recently unveiled a preview of a new collaboration with the UK-born fashion designer Hana Tajima. The new collection, which can be previewed on the brand's website, is to air sometimes in the Spring of 2016. With this new collaboration, Uniqlo is looking at adding a new fun, versatile and comfortable line of clothes to their already well curated/designed clothes. What's more, is that for the first time, we will be seeing hijabs, kebayas and jubbahs - which I think is awesome. I love that they are trying to break the cycle of purely westernized clothing by offering a new and culturally diversified range of items, that still embody the brand's core values: simplicity, quality and longevity  made to be always basic and never boring. And I love it all.

I don't usually talk fashion on this blog (not that I don't love it) but I was really taken by the beauty and simplicity of this new collaboration that I just had to share with all of you. I am really looking forward to this new collection, already eyeing the wide leg ankle length pantswide rib long sleeve tunic, and the tie back 3/4 sleeve tunic.
What do you think of designer collaborations? Have any favorite collaborations?

All images are credited to Uniqlo & Hana Tajima. This post was in no way sponsored by Uniqlo or Hana Tajima. 
All opinions are the property of the author.

Designer collaborations... you either love them or hate them. I remember the time when H&M introduced us to designer collaborations in 2004, trend later picked  up by brands such as Target and Macy's. Today, designer collaborations have sort of become a norm, everyone does them, and everyone wants them. I am usually not swayed by this trend. I might admire some pieces here and there, but to me, they never make past a season. They are not atemporal like the originals would be, and once one invests in a designer top contracted by Target, it's not long before they are out of fashion.

That said, not all collaborations are just a waste of your money. I think the best collaborations are made between brands that truly curate according to their brand image and philosophy. It is not always about signing up a big shot name, but it is more about promoting designers who fit into the house's idea, and who sometimes might not be well known by the general public. One of the few brands that I think has understood the essence of a successful designer collaboration is the Japanese clothing brand UNIQLO. Not only do they not run out of these designer made collections (so everyone has a chance to acquire a desired piece), but they carefully introduce designers who add a nice touch to the whole minimal/effortless aspect of the Japanese fashion industry.

Right now UNIQLO has two permanent designer collaborations for the men's line (Lemaire and Djokovic & Nishikori performance wear), whereas the women's collection has three permanent designer collections (Carine Roitfeld, Ines de la Fressange, and Lemaire). However, this last number is about to be bumped to four, as the Japanese brand recently unveiled a preview of a new collaboration with the UK-born fashion designer Hana Tajima. The new collection, which can be previewed on the brand's website, is to air sometimes in the Spring of 2016. With this new collaboration, Uniqlo is looking at adding a new fun, versatile and comfortable line of clothes to their already well curated/designed clothes. What's more, is that for the first time, we will be seeing hijabs, kebayas and jubbahs - which I think is awesome. I love that they are trying to break the cycle of purely westernized clothing by offering a new and culturally diversified range of items, that still embody the brand's core values: simplicity, quality and longevity  made to be always basic and never boring. And I love it all.

I don't usually talk fashion on this blog (not that I don't love it) but I was really taken by the beauty and simplicity of this new collaboration that I just had to share with all of you. I am really looking forward to this new collection, already eyeing the wide leg ankle length pantswide rib long sleeve tunic, and the tie back 3/4 sleeve tunic.
What do you think of designer collaborations? Have any favorite collaborations?

All images are credited to Uniqlo & Hana Tajima. This post was in no way sponsored by Uniqlo or Hana Tajima. 
All opinions are the property of the author.

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